Does materialism lead to unhappiness? If so, why?

standard post
Eric Barker  -  
Comments  -  

Previous research has established an inverse relationship between materialism and psychological well-being. To test the hypothesis that the link between materialism and well-being is due in part to an individual’s feelings of personal control, a sample of 440 adult Americans completed a widely-used materialism scale, the Levenson (1981) locus of control scales, and measure of positive and negative affect. Mediational analyses indicated that the significant relationship between materialism and negative affect was reduced significantly when powerful others and chance loci of control were each statistically controlled. Results are discussed with respect to the self-defeating cycle of using material possessions to boost affective well-being and in relation to other research that has explored reasons why materialism is related to lower level of psychological well-being.

Source: “Materialism and well-being: The mediating effect of locus of control” from Personality and Individual Differences, Volume 46, Issue 7, May 2009, Pages 682-686

Join over 190,000 readers. Get a free weekly update via email here.

Related posts:

How To Stop Being Lazy And Get More Done – 5 Expert Tips

How To Get People To Like You: 7 Ways From An FBI Behavior Expert

New Harvard Research Reveals A Fun Way To Be More Successful


Can being happy make you less able to resist temptation?

standard post
Eric Barker  -  
Comments  -  

We investigate the interfering influence of elevated arousal on the impact of positive mood on resistance to temptation. Three studies demonstrate that when a temptation activates long‐term health goals, baseline positive mood facilitates resistance to temptation in (1) the choice between two snack items, one of which is more unhealthy, sinful, and hard to resist (M&Ms) than the other (grapes) and (2) the monitoring of consumption when the sinful option is chosen. However, this influence is attenuated when positive mood is accompanied by elevated arousal. We demonstrate that the cognitive depletion that accompanies elevated arousal interferes with the self‐regulatory focus of positive mood, decreasing resistance to temptation.

Source: “Positive Mood and Resistance to Temptation: The Interfering Influence of Elevated Arousal” from Journal of Consumer Research

Join over 190,000 readers. Get a free weekly update via email here.

Related posts:

How To Stop Being Lazy And Get More Done – 5 Expert Tips

How To Get People To Like You: 7 Ways From An FBI Behavior Expert

New Harvard Research Reveals A Fun Way To Be More Successful


Think you have good self-control? Yes? Now you don’t.

standard post
Eric Barker  -  
Comments  -  

Four studies examined how impulse-control beliefs—beliefs regarding one’s ability to regulate visceral impulses, such as hunger, drug craving, and sexual arousal—influence the self-control process. The findings provide evidence for a restraint bias: a tendency for people to overestimate their capacity for impulse control. This biased perception of restraint had important consequences for people’s self-control strategies. Inflated impulse-control beliefs led people to overexpose themselves to temptation, thereby promoting impulsive behavior. In Study 4, for example, the impulse-control beliefs of recovering smokers predicted their exposure to situations in which they would be tempted to smoke. Recovering smokers with more inflated impulse-control beliefs exposed themselves to more temptation, which led to higher rates of relapse 4 months later. The restraint bias offers unique insight into how erroneous beliefs about self-restraint promote impulsive behavior.

Source: “The Restraint Bias: How the Illusion of Self-Restraint Promotes Impulsive Behavior” from Psychological Science, Volume 20 Issue 12, Pages 1523 – 1528

Join over 190,000 readers. Get a free weekly update via email here.

Related posts:

How To Stop Being Lazy And Get More Done – 5 Expert Tips

How To Get People To Like You: 7 Ways From An FBI Behavior Expert

New Harvard Research Reveals A Fun Way To Be More Successful


Will going to the hospital in July kill you?

standard post
Eric Barker  -  
Comments  -  

The authors found that inside medical institutions, fatal medication errors spiked in July and in no other month. This July peak was visible only in counties with teaching hospitals. In these counties, the number of July deaths from medication errors was 10 percent above the expected level. No similar link was observed for other causes of death or for deaths outside hospitals.

And

According to sociology professor David Phillips and his student Gwendolyn Barker from the University of California, San Diego, fatal medication errors peak in July in counties with teaching hospitals, which coincides with the yearly influx of new medical residents who are given increased responsibility for patient care.

Source. Hat tip: David DiSalvo

Join over 151,000 readers. Get a free weekly update via email here.

Related posts:

How To Stop Being Lazy And Get More Done – 5 Expert Tips

6 Things The Most Productive People Do Every Day

New Harvard Research Reveals A Fun Way To Be More Successful


These Weekend Activities Best Help You Recover From The Work Week

standard post
Eric Barker  -  
Comments  -  

Anything that helps you not think about work, aids relaxation and also “mastery experiences.” Doing the things you’re good at.

For most employees, the weekend offers the opportunity to recover and unwind from demands faced during the working week. In this study, first, we examined which factors contribute to employees’ successful recovery during the weekend. Second, we investigated if being highly recovered after the weekend benefits different dimensions of job performance during the week. Using a within-person design we conducted a week-level study with 133 employees over four working weeks. Participants responded to weekly web-based surveys at the beginning and at the end of the working week. Hierarchical linear modelling showed that psychological detachment, relaxation, and mastery experiences during the weekend predicted the state of being recovered at the beginning of the working week. The state of being recovered in turn predicted fluctuations in weekly task performance, personal initiative, organizational citizenship behaviour, and low perceived effort. Our results stress the importance of recovery during the weekend for both the individual and for organizations.

Source: “Recovery during the weekend and fluctuations in weekly job performance: A week-level study examining intra-individual relationships” from Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, Volume 83, Number 2, June 2010 , pp. 419-441(23)

Join over 90,000 readers and get a free weekly update via email here.

Related posts:

How To Be Resilient: 8 Steps To Success When Life Gets Hard

What 10 things should you do every day to improve your life?

How To Make Your Life Better By Sending Five Simple Emails