Do we cling to stereotypes even when information about the individual is available?

This paper experimentally investigates the role of gender-based stereotypes in the forecasting of risk attitudes. Subjects predict the gamble choice of target subjects in one of three treatments: (1) Visual—the predictor can only observe the target; (2) Information—the predictor has individuating information about the targets’ response to two statements from a risk-preference survey; and (3) Combined—the predictor both observes the targets and has the targets’ two responses to the risk-preference survey. Our results suggest that stereotypes play a considerable role in forming predictions about others’ risk attitudes and that these stereotypes persist even when individuating information is available. (JEL C91, D8, J16)

Source: “AN EXPERIMENTAL TEST OF THE PERSISTENCE OF GENDER-BASED STEREOTYPES” from Economic Inquiry

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